Structured Cabling

An effective and comprehensive structured cabling network is the cornerstone of a majority of our projects. We ensure that the highest quality grade cable is laid properly from the start to build the foundation upon which we build a complex, or even simple, voice/data network. We maintain BICSI standards in all of our installations and have a thorough final walk thru and testing process with all of our projects.

MiStar Communications structured cabling solutions consist of Category 5 Enhanced, Category 6, Category 6 Augmented, High Pair Count Copper or Fiber Optic Cabling. Our technicians are well trained and certified in Ubiquiti, Cisco, Netgear, and Linksys, to name just a few. Once a project is complete, we provide a copy of the detailed, full-page test report of each cable ID to ensure that the installation was done properly.

Six Subsystems of a Structured Cabling System

Entrance facility includes the network demarcation point, cables, protection devices, connecting hardware, and other devices that connect with the on-premises cabling at the customer premises.

The equipment room is a centralized location to house equipment and wiring consolidation points. It usually serves users inside the building or campus.

Telecommunications room or enclosure should be an enclosed area. It is designed to house telecommunications equipment, cable terminations, cross-connects and distribution frames. Generally, each building has at least one telecommunications room or enclosure. And the size of the telecommunications room or enclosure is various based on the size of the service area.

The backbone cabling is also called vertical cabling or wring. It offers the interconnection between entrance facilities, telecommunication rooms, and equipment rooms. Commonly, this type of cabling is done from floor to floor, or even between buildings. And the equipment should be connected by cables of no more than 30 m. What’s more, the cables for backbone cabling can be fiber optic cable, coaxial cable, unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable, and shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable.

The horizontal cabling refers to the cabling between telecommunications information outlet in the work area and the horizontal cross-connect in the telecommunications room (TR) or telecommunications enclosure (TE). It contains the telecommunications outlet, optional consolidation points, horizontal cable, mechanical terminations, patch cords or jumpers located in the TR or TE. This kind of wiring usually runs above the ceiling or below the floor. What’s more, both Ethernet cable and fiber optic cable are usually used for horizontal cabling.

Work Area is a place where work-area components are used to connect end-user equipment to communication outlets. The work-area components are also called cable components, including patch cables, communication outlets, and station equipment.

Why Use Structured Cabling?

Unlike the traditional point-to-point cabling system, the structured cabling system can avoid the jungle of wiring and carry increasing data at high rates. It plays a significant role in communication infrastructure. The following highlights some of the benefits:

Cost effective – The structured cabling is an organized simple cabling system. It can reduce power and maintenance costs, and it avoids spending money on locating and rectifying.

Reducing the risk of downtime – There is a high risk of human error when people managing the multiple, unorganized cabling structure. These mistakes can cause flow disruptions and network downtime. The structured cabling is organized and it’s easy to identify, which can help reduce the risk of downtime.

Time-saving – Structured cabling is flexible that can accommodate moves, adds and changes quickly. It saves installation time as well as maintenance time.